The success of your pest control Hamilton business in Niagara area will be determined by how well you run it. Do it the right way and you will see it blossoming and becoming an authority in the region. However, fail to follow the right approach and you will be followed by a myriad of problems – being sued by dissatisfied customers, environmental bodies, local authorities or even closing shop. The following are some of the essential steps:

1. Identify the Scope of your Business

Pest control in Niagara area is quite diverse and is influenced by the area of operation. Some pests or bugs will be found in one area and not in another. It is therefore important to first understand and ascertain what your firm will be handling. This entailing researching on what pests are common in the area and what tools and skills you will need. Common pests include white ants (termites), rodents (mice, rats), reptiles (lizards, snakes), insects (bees, roaches, spiders) and more.

2. Apply for Licenses

Like any other business, your pest control service will also need to be registered and given an operating license. Failing to apply for a license is not only illegal but can also land you in problems. You need to indicate the nature of doing business in  Niagara area, and formation (sole proprietorship, partnership or company). To be awarded the license you will have to meet the regulations and requirements set out by the department of agriculture, local authority, and also environmental agencies.

3. Get Business Insurance

When offering pest control services in Hamilton, there is always a possibility of damaging property or someone getting injured. To cater for the unseen losses, it pays to go for business insurance. It will cover property damage, general liability, worker’s compensation, auto and other issues. Nowadays, people are also going for surety bond that safeguards them in case of a future settlement or lawsuit.

You will need to identify a good location for your business. It should be within reach and easily accessible to your customers. The space should be adequate for storing your equipment and vehicles and stop unauthorized persons from entering. In addition to ensuring your pest control business runs smoothly, following the above tips also gives you peace-of-mind.

Description

Winds, waves, fog, lightning, hail, tornadoes .... hurricanes! The wise boater respects and anticipates mother nature’s many moods. Beyond “red sky in the morning”, this course provides boaters with the tools to find and accurately interpret weather reports and forecasts, and to develop keen judgments in “reading” the sky and sea for optimum boating safety in and around Canadian waters. Newly developed for adult learners, this course will measure learning success not by closed-book, memory-work exams, but by practical, open-book applications of learned concepts to actual boating situations.

Topics:

1. The Atmosphere, Temperature, Heat
2. Wind, Pressure, Waves
3. Water, Humidity, Fog, Precipitation
4. Stability, Clouds
5. Thunderstorms and Tornadoes
6. Mid-Latitude Weather and Storms
7. Overview of Special Topics: e.g. hurricanes

Description

Enjoyment and safety on the water require knowledge. Boating Essentials will take you to the next level in your boating education. Technology has changed the way that we navigate. However, in order to use a GPS/chartplotter effectively, you should understand the use of paper charts and coastal navigation. The topics covered in this course, magnetic compass, global positioning and charts, navigation, conning, plotting, digital charting, anchoring, lines and ropes, will increase your boating knowledge and make your adventures on the water safe and enjoyable.

Description

All operators of motorized pleasure craft are required to show proof of operator competency. All you need to know for the Transport Canada test is presented in an easy to read format that is both informative and entertaining. You can be confident that this study guide meets all the standards established by Transport Canada’s Office of Boating Safety.

As an extra benefit, if you pass the test offered by Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons, your Card is recognized by BOTH Transport Canada and The National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (USA). You may contact Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons to locate a testing facility in your area.

Description

The third course in our series explores navigation further as you learn how to plot and label on paper charts as well as what the skipper should be doing before setting out and when under way, handling a boat under sail as well as your environmental responsibilities and electrical hazards,. This course also has a number of optional topics that will be taught depending on your interests; these include tides and currents, canals and locks, and collision regulations.

Suggested Prerequisite: Boating 2: Beyond the PCOC

5-6 weeks one evening per week

The third course in our series explores navigation further as you learn how to plot and label on paper charts as well as what the skipper should be doing before setting out and when under way, handling a boat under sail as well as your environmental responsibilities and electrical hazards,. This course also has a number of optional topics that will be taught depending on your interests; these include tides and currents, canals and locks, and collision regulations.

Suggested Prerequisite: Boating 2: Beyond the PCOC

5-6 weeks one evening per week

Description

The PCOC makes sure you have immediate navigation and safety skills but it’s just the beginning of what you should know when you get on a boat. In the second of our Boating Series, you are introduced to the art of navigation, anchoring, ropes, lines and knots – not to mention what to expect when the boat is moving under power. This course also has a number of optional topics that will be taught depending on your interests; these include towing, trailering and a check list for layup and launch.

Suggested Prerequisite: Boating 1: Pleasure Craft Operator Card (PCOC)

The PCOC makes sure you have immediate navigation and safety skills but it’s just the beginning of what you should know when you get on a boat. In the second of our Boating Series, you are introduced to the art of navigation, anchoring, ropes, lines and knots – not to mention what to expect when the boat is moving under power. This course also has a number of optional topics that will be taught depending on your interests; these include towing, trailering and a check list for layup and launch.

Suggested Prerequisite: Boating 1: Pleasure Craft Operator Card (PCOC)

Take the Course